Growing Access to the Outdoors

By NOLS

Jun 1, 2020

Teens look over a forested mountain ridge
Photo by Hannah Darrin

What's one way to support a growing outdoor ethic and protection of wild spaces? By bringing people there so they can touch, smell, and feel what's so special about being in the outdoors.

NOLSies are set up well to be leaders in this area, and this story highlights just a few people who are working hard to increase access to the outdoors.

Wilderness Works: Expanding Outdoor Access

Victor High smiles and points to a trail sign
Photo courtesy of Victor High

Starting with weekend visits to local parks and museums during the school year, Wilderness Works also makes it possible for underserved and homeless children to attend weeklong summer camps.

Kenna Kuhn, NOLS Ambassador

Kenna Kuhn overlooks a mountain valley while backpacking
Photo by Maddy Marshall

Kenna shares the story of developing a fee-free outing club at the University of Denver focused on competence and closing the income gap among students who recreated outdoors at her school.

USNA Midshipman Turned NOLS Instructor

A group of backpackers looks at the map
Photo by Nick Valentine

USNA grad and Marine veteran Mike Titzer reflects on the lessons he learned on his student course and his return to Alaska as a NOLS instructor.

Written By

NOLS

NOLS is a nonprofit global wilderness school that seeks to help you step forward boldly as a leader.

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two backcountry skiers make their way to the top of a slope at sunset, accompanied by a small dog
Photo by Michelle Yarham

Editor’s Note: On NOLS expeditions, students learn tolerance for adversity and uncertainty in the field. Today, people around the world are facing profound adversity and uncertainty in their home communities. We chose to share this reflection written by instructor Navarana Smith—prior to today’s global health crisis—in hopes that it will resonate and inspire readers to look forward with hope.

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